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Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

Click to submit INCIDENT REPORT!    ICS REPORT! 

 
     
 

Monthly meeting will begin at 7 p.m. and end no later than 8:30 p.m.

A social to include refreshments will be held after each meeting.

Meeting agendas will be published on our web site to include announcements of training subjects, speakers and invited guests.

Monthly post news letters will be posted on our web site.

Links to veteran surveys will be posted on our web site.

Critical incident reports, police reports, missing children reports, scam reports, property loss reports, etc. will be reviewed on-line at each meeting.

Critical Incident Response Team (CIRT) briefings will we reported during social hours.

Informal discussion will be held on Homeland Security and Event Management concerns in Liberty Grove.    

 

Our goal is to design response and recovery partnerships at all levels of the public and private sectors. Orders for the day include:
  1. NIMS Definitions.
  2. Case studies based on worst-case scenarios.
  3. Post' discussions and conclusions.
  4. Strategic Action Plans for 2008 & 2009.

Incident Command System (ICS) 

Orders for the NIGHT....  

Our mission is to hold training that lasts between 45 minutes and one hour. Our goal is to, as much as possible keep monthly post meets starting at 7 p.m. sharp, concluding post business before 7:30 and training before 8:30 p.m. At no time will our business and training meetings last past 8:30 p.m. An after meeting social hour will include coffee, donuts, beer and soft drinks.

 ill force you to take command as a "single" command or order a "unified meeting social Your orders for the day include case studies that w" command (15 minutes).

We'll than hold a "best practices" open forum and discuss the need and benefits of pre-established public-to-private partnerships.

Finally, we'll develop ICS "Strategic Action Plans" for Door County veterans during 2007 and 2008.

Rich Woldt  - VFW Post 8337

 

Can you answer or could you speak on the following subjects?

 

  • How to Identify, Measure, and Control Terrorist's Threats in Door County.

  • How to report suspicious activity to the proper authorities.

  • What to do when you're the first person at the scene of an accident, medical emergency, natural disaster, or terrorist attack.

  • How to use the Incident Command System (ICS).

  • How to establish an "Emergency Operations Center (EOC)".

  • How to set up and manage a "Staging" Area.

  • How to assist Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) at the scene.

  • How to assist Fire Fighters at the scene.

  • How to assist Law Enforcement at the scene.

  • How to assist the Coast Guard at the scene.

  • How to assist the National Guard at the scene.

  • How to prepare a landing area for helicopters.

  • How to evacuate a building during a fire or bomb threat.

  • How to assist in house-in-place or evacuate a township.

  • How to handle anthrax scares within and outside of a building. 

  • How to conduct a search for a mission child or adult.

  • How to respond to a violent act at work, at school, at church, or while attending a community festival or sporting event.

  • How to extricate a target from a building, during a parade, or from an auditorium.

  • How to locate, lockdown, and link extortion targets to the EOC.

  • How to handle a hostage negotiation.

  • How to handle the media during and after a life threatening crisis.

  • How to prepare for an event such as a parade or the arrival of a high visibility terrorist targets. 

  • How to handle a sniper attack.

  • How to prepare for an advancing wildfire.

  • How to prepare for, survive, and recover from a tornado.

 

By design, tutorials are designed to work whether you're a veterans' post, church, school, business association, credit union chapter, national/international association or social club. The goal is to create tutorials that in and of themselves automatically create a "unified" command when a community is in harms way. Click here for a short white paper on forming partnerships and unified commands. 

 

 
 

This tutorial is under construction:  Use it as an outline only....

Operation Performance Standards:

  • Veterans report in if and when they are called up by our local Fire Chief, Door County's Director of Emergency Government, or Sheriff, an Incident Commander. This usually occurs when municipal first responders are overwhelmed, show signs of " burned out", mutual aid agreements are exhausted, the incident' duration exceeds 14 days, or there is a call for a "Multi-Agency Coordination (MAC)" or  "Critical Incident Response " Team!

 

  • Veterans deploy under the same Incident Command System (ICS) protocols used by professional fire fighters, law enforcement, emergency government, and homeland security personnel.  This helps ensure a seamless integration of response personnel and response assets.

 

  • The County Veterans Service Officer (CVSO) should act as the "Multi-Post Coordinator (MPC)" and ICS liaison between post commanders, the country Director of Emergency Government, and the County Emergency Operations Center (EOC). This helps ensure all veterans and posts are kept well informed, keep focused on their mission, while reducing the number of liaison officers at the EOC.  

 

  • The Post' Commander closest to the incident's "Hot Zone" should take command as soon as he/she learns of or arrives at the site of the incident. The IC's duties are to assess the scope, declare the level, estimate the duration, evaluate the potential for "scope creep," and determine whether to launch a "single" or a "Unified Command." 

Case studies are used to train and test the troops. Click Here....

FYI: In the US the local fire chief is always considered the primary Incident Commander representing the municipality and its citizens. States in the US are all "Home Rule" States meaning the municipality in which the incident occurs is primarily responsible for all response and recovery efforts. The local Fire Chief therefore always takes command, assesses the situation and determines whether a "single" or "unified command and implements an appropriate "unified" response. he primary "Incident Commander" His first duty is to declare the incident and  The Commander of the post closest to the incident becomes the first "Incident Commander"  

The Incident Command System has been used since the turn of the century to take control during any large scale disaster such as the annual flooding in the southwest USA. It was formally adopted by fire fighters in the 1940's to fight forest fires traveling across municipal' boundaries. We use Incident Command and Control to mobilize veterans during a natural disaster, terrorist attack, pandemic, or community crisis. Our mission is to train veterans so they'll be ready to reinforce fire fighters, law enforcement, emergency governments, and homeland security personnel if and when these professional first responders are overwhelmed, burned out, or the duration of the incident goes past 14 days. Our goal is not to replace trained, professional first responders but rather to provide Door County Wisconsin with a fourth shift of responders if and when they're needed.

 

 

 Incident Commander & Staff Briefing!

Tutorial' Goals and Objectives: Provide veterans with a "training base" resource and the general public with a "Performance Based" tutorial on Incident Command.  

Click on colored icons to navigate tutorial! This tutorial is an edited version of training materials used in accredited ICS courses offer to professional first responders. This tutorial is a guide for veterans. Consult with local law enforcement and your local fire chief for advance training and specific response protocols recommended in your community.   

This tutorial  is provided as a guide for first responders.  Any reference to the National Incident Management System (NIMS) published in March of 2004 is coincidental and is not implied to be NIMS adopted protocol but rater generally excepted Incident Command System response procedures. NIMS is and will continue to evolve as the common language and terminology used by professional first responders.   

Refer to Module 6 “Common Responsibilities” of the National Wildfire Coordinating Group curriculum for additional response recommendations.

Rich Woldt - CEO The Risk Management Learning Center

 


Incident Commander - Command Staff

"Experience is your greatest teacher!"

Note to Reader:  We recommend two people be selected for each position and everyone be cross trained. You'll never know who will be available when disaster strikes!

Incident Commander: There is one “Incident Commander (IC) for each incident so all coordination flows to one person authorized to act. The IC should be the one most familiar with the incident. If needed, the IC designates three Command Staff. “Safety” monitors the scene to ensure its safe and all responders are qualified, equipped and ready to roll, “Information” handles the media and makes sure everyone is informed of facts as they unfold. And to ensure everyone know where to go and to who they'll report, the “Liaison” coordinates responding agencies when the IC moves from a “Single Command” to a “Unified Command.”

Agency Checklist ---
Operations Chief
Staging Area Director
Planning Chief
Logistics Chief
Finance Chief

Interactive Tutorial Table of Contents -

(Click topic to navigate this document)

 

TOPICS: Organization / Assumption of Command / Incident Commander Checklist / Major Responsibilities and Tasks: Conduct initial briefings - Set up required organization elements - Ensure planning meetings are held & Incident Action Plans are written - Approve and authroize implementation of Incdent Action Plans - Determine information needs from staff and Section Chiefs - Manage incident operations - Approve requests for additional resources - Authorize information releases - Report incident status - Authorize demobilization planning for personnel and resources!

Coordinate Command Staff activities - Release resources and supplies!

Information Officer

TOPICS: Information Officer checklist - Responsibilities & Tasks - Identify Information Officer Activities - Establish an Information Center as Required - Prepare a Press Briefing - Collect and Assemble Incident Information - Provide Liaison between Media and Incident Personnel - Respond to Special Requests for Information - Maintain the Unit Log!
 

Safety Officer

TOPICS: Safety Officer Checklist - Responsibilities & Tasks - Checklist instructions - Obtain a Briefing from the Incident Commander - Identify Hazardous Situations Associated with the Incident Environment Prior to First Planning Meeting - Attend the Planning Meeting to Advise on Safety Matters - Identify Potentially Unsafe Situations - Advise Incident Personnel in Matters Affecting Personnel Safety - Exercise Emergency Authority to Prevent or Stop Unsafe Acts - Investigate (or Coordinate Investigation of) Accidents that Occur within the Incident Area  - Review the Medical Plan - Maintain the Unit Log!
 

Liaison Officer

TOPICS: Liaison Officer Checklist - Obtain a briefing - Provide point of contact for assisting and/or cooperating agencies - Identify current or potential interagency problems - Maintain the Unit Log!

INCIDENT COMMANDER CHECKLIST 

ORGANIZATION

The Incident Commander is responsible for the overall management of all incident activities, including the development and implementation of strategy, and for approving the ordering and release of resources.  In multi-jurisdictional incidents, the duties of the Incident Commander may be carried out by a unified command established jointly by the agencies that have direct jurisdictional or functional responsibility for the incident.  In those single-jurisdiction incidents where assisting agencies have significant resources committed, the responsible agency may establish a unified command at the incident command level, or place assisting agency personnel in key positions within the organizational structure.  The Incident Commander may have a deputy.  The deputy’s responsibilities will be as delegated by the Incident Commander. 

ASSUMPTION OF COMMAND

Taking over the command of the incident requires that the Incident Commander obtain a complete and up-to-date incident briefing.  This can only be accomplished if the individual who is relinquishing command can bring the new commander up to date on what the situation is at the time of the briefing.  Therefore, it is important that the commander being relieved prepares the Incident Briefing (ICS Form 201 or local form) as completely as possible for the new commander.

The Incident Commander will assume command of an incident after the overall situation is reviewed.  Prior to the briefing, the outgoing Incident Commander must ensure that sufficient resources have been ordered.  He or she must also ensure that a designated individual is left in charge while he or she is briefing the incoming Incident Commander.

 INCIDENT COMMANDER CHECKLIST 

Instructions:  The checklist below presents the minimum requirements for all Incident Commanders.  Note that some activities are one-time actions, while others are ongoing or repetitive for the duration of an incident.

COMPLETED/NOT APPLICABLE

TASKS

         

Obtain an incident briefing and Incident Briefing Form (ICS Form 201) from the prior Incident Commander.

        

Assess the incident situation.

        

Determine incident goals and strategic objectives.

        

Establish the immediate priorities.

        

Establish an Incident Command Post.

        

Conduct the initial briefing.

        

Activate elements of the Incident Command System, as required.

        

Brief the command staff and section chiefs.

        

Ensure that planning meetings are conducted.

        

Approve and authorize the implementation of the incident action plan.

        

Ensure that adequate safety measures are in place.

        

Determine information needs and inform command personnel.

        

Coordinate staff activity.

        

Coordinate with key people and officials.

        

Manage incident operations.

        

Approve requests for additional resources and requests for release of resources.

        

Approve the use of trainees at the incident.

        

Authorize release of information to the news media.

        

Ensure that the Incident Status Summary (ICS Form 209 or local form) is completed and forwarded to the dispatch center(s).

        

Approve a plan for demobilization.

        

Release resources and supplies.

 

INCIDENT COMMANDER

MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES AND TASKS

The major responsibilities of the Incident Commander are listed below.  Following each are tasks for implementing the responsibility.

RESPONSIBILITY

TASKS

Conduct Initial Briefing

       Obtain and review the Incident Briefing Form (ICS Form 201 or local form) with the Incident Commander.

       Meet with the prior Incident Commander (as appropriate) and selected staff available at that time.

       Review and/or prepare plans for the use of on-scene and allocated resources scheduled to arrive before the next planning meeting.


 

Set Up Required Organization Elements

       Confirm the dispatch and/or arrival of requested organizational elements.

       Hold a briefing and assign work tasks to general and command staffs.  This briefing should include:

¨       The contents of the Incident Briefing Form.

¨       A summary of the incident organization.

¨       A review of current incident activities.

¨       A summary of resources already dispatched.

¨       The time and location of the first planning meeting.

¨       Special instructions, including specific delegation of authority to carry out particular functions.

       Reassign the prior Incident Commander to a position within the incident organization (as appropriate).

       Request required additional resources through normal dispatch channels.

       Notify the Resources Unit of the command and general staff organizational elements activated, including the name of the person assigned to each position.


 

RESPONSIBILITY

 Planning TASKS

Ensure Planning Meetings are Conducted

 

 

 

       Schedule a meeting time and location.

       Notify the attendees, including:

¨       Prior Incident Commander (required at first general planning meeting).

¨       Command and general staffs.

¨       Others as desired (e.g., communications, resources, and Situation Unit and Operations Branch Directors).

       Develop the general objectives for the incident action plan.

       Participate in the development of the incident action plan for the next operational period.

       Participate in the preparation of logistics services and support requirements associated with the incident action plan (e.g., the communications plan).

       Review safety considerations with the Safety Officer.

       Summarize the decisions made about the:

¨       General strategy selected.

¨       Control objectives selected for the next operational period.

¨       Resources required.

¨       Service and support requirements.

Approve and Authorize Implementation of the Incident action plan

Note:  In some instances, there tasks may be done orally.

       Review the incident action plan for completeness and accuracy.

       Make any required changes and authorize the release of the plan.

Determine Information Needs from Staff

       Identify any special information desired from each section chief.

       Prepare information item lists for each section and command staff element (as appropriate).

       Provide lists to appropriate personnel or facility.  (Note:  This may be done orally in some situations.)


 

RESPONSIBILITY

Operations TASKS

Manage Incident Operations

       Review information concerning significant changes in the status of the situation, predicted incident behavior, weather, or status of resources.

       Review modification to the current incident action plan received from the Operations Section Chief.

       Identify any major changes to incident operations which are required immediately.

Approve Requests for Additional Resources

       Review requests for additional resources.

       Determine the condition and advisability of activating out-of-service resources.

       Have the Planning Section Chief provide a list of resources for reassignment if out-of-service resources are to be activated.  Include the time needed, reporting location, and to whom to report.

       To obtain additional resources from off the incident, direct the Logistics Section Chief to forward the request through normal channels.

Authorize Information Release

 

 

 

       Review materials submitted by the Information Officer for release to the news media.

       Check information release policies and constraints with involved jurisdiction officials.

       Authorize the release of the final copy.

Report Incident Status

       Have the Incident Status Summary Report (ICS Form 209 or local form) prepared.

       Ensure that the incident status summary is submitted to local agency dispatch centers, as required.

Approve Demobilization Planning

       Review recommendations for the release of resources and supplies from the Demobilization Unit.

       Schedule a demobilization planning meeting.

       Ensure that current and future resource and supply requirements have been closely estimated.

       Establish general service and support requirements.

       Modify specific work assignments for general and command staff, as required.

       Summarize the actions to be taken.

       Have the Planning Section Chief document the demobilization plan.


 

RESPONSIBILITY

TASKS

Coordinate Staff Activity

       Periodically check the progress on assigned tasks of Logistics, Planning, Operations, and Finance/Administration Sections, as well as command staff personnel.

       Ensure that the general welfare and safety of personnel is adequate.

       Notify the Resources Unit of changes to the command or general staff organization, including the name of the person assigned to each position.

Release Resources and Supplies

       Review recommendations for any release of resources and supplies from the general staff.

       Approve release recommendations.

       Ensure that local agency dispatch centers are notified of the intended release.

       Direct the Planning Section Chief to prepare an assignment list for the release of resources.

       Direct the Logistics Section Chief to release supplies.

 

INFORMATION OFFICER CHECKLIST of RESPONSIBILITIES

The Information Officer, a member of the command staff, is responsible for the collection and release of information about the incident to the news media and other appropriate agencies and organizations.  The Information Officer reports to the Incident Commander. 

Instructions:  The checklist below presents the minimum requirements for Information Officers.  Note that some items are one-time actions, while others are ongoing or repetitive throughout the incident.

 

 

COMPLETED/NOT APPLICABLE

TASKS

        

Contact the jurisdictional agency to coordinate public information activities.

        

Establish a Joint Information Center (JIC), whenever possible.

        

Determine from the Incident Commander if there are any limits on information release.

        

Arrange for necessary work space, materials, telephones, and staffing.

        

Obtain copies of the Incident Commander’s Situation Status Summary Report  (ICS Form 209 or local form).

        

Prepare an initial information summary as soon as possible after arrival.

        

Observe constraints on the release of information imposed by the Incident Commander.

        

Obtain approval for information release from the Incident Commander.

        

Release news to the media and post information at the Incident Command Post and other appropriate location(s).

        

Attend meetings between the media and incident personnel.

        

Arrange for meetings between the media and incident personnel.

        

Provide escort service to the media and VIPs.

        

Provide protective clothing for the media and VIPs (as appropriate).

        

Respond to special requests for information.

        

Maintain the unit log (ICS Form 214 or local form).

 

INFORMATION OFFICER MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES AND TASKS

The major responsibilities of the Information Officer are listed below.  Following each are tasks for implementing the responsibility.

RESPONSIBILITY

TASKS

Identify Information Officer Activities

       Contact the jurisdiction’s responsible agency to determine what other external public information activities are being performed for this incident.

       Establish the coordination of information acquisition and dissemination.

       Compile the information, and maintain records.

Establish an Information Center as Required

       Establish an information center adjacent to the Incident Command Post area where it will not interfere with Incident Command Post activities.

       Contact the Facilities Unit for any support required to set up the information center.

Prepare a Press Briefing

       Obtain from the Incident Commander any constraints on the release of information.

       Select the information to be released (e.g., the size of the incident, the agencies involved, etc.).

       Prepare the material for release (obtained from the Incident Briefing [ICS Form 201 or local form], Situation Unit status reports, etc.).

       Obtain the Incident Commander’s approval for release.  (Note:  The Incident Commander may give blanket release authority.)

       Release the information for distribution to the news media.

       Release the information to press representatives at the joint information center (JIC).

       Post a copy of all information summaries in the Incident Command Post area and at other appropriate incident locations (e.g., base, camps, etc.).


 

RESPONSIBILITY

TASKS

Collect and Assemble Incident Information

       Obtain the latest situation status and fire behavior prediction information from the appropriate Situation Unit Leader.

       Observe incident operations.

       Hold discussions with incident personnel.

       Identify special event information (e.g., evacuations, injuries, etc.).

       Contact external agencies for additional information.

       Review the current incident action plan (ICS Form 202 or local form).

       Repeat the above procedures as necessary to satisfy media needs.

Provide Liaison between Media and Incident Personnel

       Receive requests from the media to meet with incident personnel and vice versa.

       Identify the parties involved in the request (e.g., the Incident Commander for TV interviewers, etc.).

       Determine if policies have been established to handle requests, and, if so, proceed accordingly.

       Obtain any required permission to satisfy a request (i.e., the Incident Commander’s).

       Fulfill the request or advise the requesting party of the inability to do so, as the case may be.

       Coordinate as necessary with the Incident Commander for news media flights into the incident area.

Respond to Special Requests for Information

       Receive request for information.

       Determine if the requested information is currently available, and, if so, provide it to the requesting party.

       Determine if currently unavailable information can be reasonably obtained by contacting incident personnel.

       Assemble the desired and/or available information, and provide it to the requesting party.

Maintain the Unit Log

       Record the Information Officer’s actions on the unit log (ICS Form 214 or local form).

       Collect and transmit information summaries and unit logs to the Documentation Unit at the end of each operational period.

 

SAFETY OFFICER CHECKLIST & RESPONSIBILITIES

The Safety Officer, a member of the command staff, is responsible for monitoring and assessing hazardous and unsafe situations and developing measures for assuring personnel safety.  The Safety Officer will correct unsafe acts or conditions through the regular line of authority, although he or she may exercise emergency authority to stop or prevent unsafe acts when immediate action is required.  The Safety Officer maintains an awareness of active and developing situations, approves the medical plan, and includes safety messages in each incident action plan.  The Safety Officer reports to the Incident Commander.
 
Checklist Instructions:  The checklist below presents the minimum requirements for Safety Officers.  Note that some items are one-time actions, while others are ongoing or repetitive throughout the incident.

COMPLETED/NOT APPLICABLE

TASKS

        

Obtain an incoming briefing from the Incident Commander.

        

Identify hazardous situations associated with the incident.

        

Participate in planning meetings.

        

Review the incident action plan.

        

Identify potentially unsafe situations.

        

Exercise emergency authority to stop and prevent unsafe acts.

        

Investigate accidents that have occurred within the incident area.

        

Assign assistants as needed.

        

Review and approve the medical plan (ICS Form 206 or local form).

        

Maintain the unit log (ICS Form 214 or local form).

 

SAFETY OFFICER MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES AND TASKS

The major responsibilities of the Safety Officer are listed below. Following each are tasks for implementing the responsibility.

RESPONSIBILITY

TASKS

Obtain a Briefing from the Incident Commander

       Receive a briefing from the Incident Commander to obtain:

¨      Relieved Incident Commander’s Incident Briefing (ICS Form 201 or local form).

¨      Summary of the incident organization.

¨      Special instructions.

       Obtain a copy of the incident action plan from the Incident Commander.

Identify Hazardous Situations Associated with the Incident Environment Prior to First Planning Meeting

       Identify and resolve unsafe situations in the incident area (e.g., unsafe sleeping areas, absence of protective clothing etc.).

       Compile and record hazardous and potentially hazardous situations for presentation at the planning meeting.

Attend the Planning Meeting to Advise on Safety Matters

       Review the suggested strategy and control operations as presented at the planning meeting.

       Identify potentially hazardous situations associated with the proposed plans and/or strategies.

       Advise the general staff of such situations.

Identify Potentially Unsafe Situations

       Review the incident action plan.

       Receive reports from incident personnel concerning safety matters.

       Review reports to identify hazardous environmental and operational situations.

       Personally survey the incident environment and operations, as appropriate.

       Obtain and review Situation Unit information to identify unsafe situations.


 

RESPONSIBILITY

TASKS

Advise Incident Personnel in Matters Affecting Personnel Safety

       Identify potentially hazardous situations.  (See previous tasks.)

       Determine the appropriate actions to ensure personnel safety.

       Coordinate with incident supervisory personnel, as required.

       Advise incident personnel as to the appropriate action.

Exercise Emergency Authority to Prevent or Stop Unsafe Acts

       Identify potentially hazardous situations. (See previous tasks.)

       Determine the severity of the situation.

       Determine if the situation requires the use of emergency authority, and, if so, exercise that authority to prevent or stop the act.

       Coordinate with the appropriate supervisory personnel.

Investigate (or Coordinate Investigation of) Accidents that Occur within the Incident Area

       Receive notification of the accident.

       Obtain information concerning the accident by:

¨       Interviewing personnel.

¨       Visiting the scene of the accident.

¨       Photographing the scene (if appropriate).

¨       Collecting evidence (if appropriate).

¨       Collecting reports prepared by involved personnel.

 

       Reconstruct the accident events.

       Identify the cause of the accident (if possible).

       Recommend corrective action.

       Prepare the accident report and submit it to the Incident Commander.


 

RESPONSIBILITY

TASKS

Review the Medical Plan

       Coordinate with the Medical Unit Leader on the preparation of the medical plan (ICS Form 206 or local form).

       Review the plan for completeness.

       Discuss areas of concern with the Medical Unit Leader and provide instructions for correction.

Maintain the Unit Log

       Record the Safety Officer’s actions on the unit log (ICS Form 214 or local form).

       Collect and transmit required records and logs to the Documentation Unit at the end of each operational period.

 

LIAISON OFFICER CHECKLIST & RESPONSIBILITIES

The Liaison Officer is responsible for interacting (by providing a point of contact) with the assisting and cooperating agencies, including fire agencies, the American Red Cross, law enforcement, public works and engineering organizations, and others. When agencies assign agency representatives to the incident, the Liaison Officer will coordinate their activities.  As a member of the command staff, the Liaison Officer reports to the Incident Commander.
 
Checklist Instructions:  The checklist below presents the minimum requirements for Liaison Officers.  Note that some items are one-time actions, while others are ongoing throughout the incident.

COMPLETED/NOT APPLICABLE

TASKS

        

Obtain a briefing from Incident Commander.

        

Provide a point of contact for assisting and/or coordinating with agency representatives.

        

Identify representatives from each involved agency, including a communications link and his or her location.

        

Keep agencies supporting the incident aware of incident status.

        

Respond to requests from incident personnel for interorganizational contacts.

        

Monitor incident operations to identify current or potential inter-organizational contacts.

        

Participate in planning meetings, providing current resource status, including limitations and capability of assisting agency resources.

        

Maintain the unit log (ICS Form 214 or local form).

 

LIAISON OFFICER MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES AND TASKS

The major responsibilities of the Liaison Officer are listed below.  Following each are tasks for implementing the responsibility.

RESPONSIBILITY

TASKS

Obtain a Briefing

       Receive a briefing from the Incident Commander and obtain the:

¨      Incident Briefing Report (ICS Form 201 or local form).

¨      Summary of the incident organization.

¨      Names of agencies currently involved in the incident.

¨      Special instructions from the Incident Commander.

       Obtain the incident action plan, when available.

Provide Point of Contact for Assisting and/or Cooperating Agencies

       Identify assisting and cooperating agencies from:

¨       The Incident Briefing Report (ICS Form 201 or local form).

¨       Local dispatchers.

       Determine if assisting and cooperating agencies have assigned agency representatives.  If so, obtain their names, locations, and communication channels by contacting:

¨       The agencies.

¨       The Incident Commander.

¨       The agencies’ senior officers at the scene.

       Receive requests for contacts between incident personnel and agency personnel.

       Identify the appropriate personnel to contact (either incident or agency personnel).

       Establish contact with the appropriate personnel.

       Take the necessary action to satisfy requests.

       Notify concerned personnel.


 

RESPONSIBILITY

TASKS

Identify Current or Potential Interagency Problems

       Receive complaints pertaining to matters such as a lack of logistics, inadequate communications, and personnel problems.

       Personally observe incident operations to identify current or potential interagency problems.

       Notify the appropriate personnel of current or potential problems.

Maintain the Unit Log

       Record key actions on the unit log (ICS Form 201 or local form).

       Collect and transmit the required records and logs to the Documentation Unit at the end of each operational period.

 

AGENCY REPRESENTATIVE CHECKLIST & RESPONSIBILITIES

An Agency Representative is assigned to an incident from an assisting or cooperating agency with full authority to make decisions on all matters affecting that agency’s participation at the incident.  Agency Representatives report to the Liaison Officer, if that position has been filled.  If there is no Liaison Officer, Agency Representatives report to the Incident Commander.  There will be only one Agency Representative from each agency assigned to the incident.
 
Checklist Instructions:  The checklist below presents the minimum requirements for Agency Representatives.  Note that some of the activities are one-time actions, while others are ongoing throughout the incident.

 

COMPLETED/NOT APPLICABLE

TASKS

        

Check in at the Incident Command Post.  Complete the check-in list (ICS Form 211 or local form).  Ensure that all agency resources have completed check-in.

        

Obtain a briefing from the Liaison Officer or Incident Commander.

        

Establish a working location.  Advise agency personnel at the incident that the agency representative position has been filled.

        

Attend planning meetings, as required.

        

Provide input on the use of agency resources if no resource technical specialists are assigned.

        

Cooperate fully with the Incident Commander and general staff on the agency’s involvement at the incident.

        

Oversee the well-being and safety of agency personnel assigned to the incident.

        

Advise the Liaison Officer of any special agency needs or requirements.

        

Determine if any special reports or documents are required.

        

Report to agency dispatch or headquarters on a prearranged schedule.

        

Ensure that all agency personnel and/or equipment are properly accounted for and released prior to your departure.

        

Ensure that all required agency forms, reports, and documents are complete prior to your departure.

        

Hold a debriefing session with the Liaison Officer or Incident Commander prior to departure.

 

The DCVets ICS is staffed at the discretion of the Post Commanders.. TBD is "To Be Determined"
 
Post Commander (Reports to Veteran Service Officer)

Incident Commander

Post Safety Officer

Safety         

Post Information Officer
Information
Post AG
Liaison          
Operations Chief

To Be Determined

Planning Chief

To Be Determined

Logistics Chief

To Be Determined

Finance Chief
To Be Determined
 

Staging Area Director

To Be Determined

  Life Safety
  Communications
  Transportation & Evacuations
  Reconstruction
 

Liaisons: Designated by Incident Commander

TBD

Law Enforcement

TBD

Fire Department

TBD

Trauma Mgmt

TBD

Fraud Investigator

TBD

SWAT & Hazmat Coordinator

TBD

Legal Liability

Dick Radtke Media Mgmt & Press Releases

 
David McGuinn

SD Box Security

John Vrabec

Safes, Vaults, Alarms, Surveillance   Equipment

Charles Eikel Director of Volunteers & Community Outreach  Personnel (The Red Cross, S-Army, Chamber of Com., Schools, Churches, Military Organizations -VFW -AMVET, business Asso., Etc)
 


Risk Management

Field Tests - 2008

 
 
 
 
Incident Commander     Fire Chief Sturgeon Bay - Tim Herlache
  Safety :  Sheriff -       Terry Vogel       
  Information:  Chairman of County Board -         Charlie Most
  Liaison:    
 
Operations Chief                       Fire Chief              Sister Bay -    Chris Hecht
 
Planning Chief Director of Emergency Government -Richard “Dick” Burress 
 
Logistics Chief Coordinator of Emergency Government -   Ann Demeuse
 
Finance Chief Shirley Scalish County Clerk - Nancy A. Bemmen
 
Staging Area Director   Deputy Sheriff - Bill Larson
 
Law Enforcement Liaison      Deputy Sheriff - Jim Grondon
 
 
Fire Fighter Liaison            Egg Harbor Fire chief  - Mark Boegenschultlz
 
 Trauma Mgmt EMT - Jim Olson
 
Fraud Investigator Sheriff -           Terry Vogel
 
SWAT & Hazmat Coordinators -Tim Herlache &  Chris Hecht
 
Legal Liability
  Business Liaison
President - Business Association
  Veterans County Service Officer - Scot McFarland
  Red Cross
Doctors and Nurses
  Chamber of Commerce
   
   
   

       
 

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